Sunday, July 31, 2011

It's always so much fun to give away great books!! Congratulations to this week's lucky winner:

Eva – Marrying Miss Marshal by Lacy Williams

Eva, please use the button in the upper right side of this page to email me with your mailing address so I can forward your information to the author. Then, sit back and wait for your book to arrive.

Thank you all so much for stopping by The Borrowed Book and thank you, Lacy Williams, for your generosity in providing a book!

Friday, July 29, 2011

Entering our weekly drawing is easy:

1. Leave a comment on Fridays or...

2. Sign up to follow The Borrowed Book. Followers will automatically be entered for a chance to win that week's drawing!


This week, The Borrowed Book is giving away:


Marrying Miss Marshal by Lacy Williams ~ A Woman in a Mans Job

Filling the shoes of her late husband as town marshal hasn't been easy for Danna Carpenter. She's not only fighting criminals, she's also fighting to earn the respect of the townspeople. So crossing paths with tenderfoot detective Chas O'Grady is the last thing she needs. He's hunting a band of cattle rustlers and isn't used to the rugged Wyoming landscape. Teaming up is their only option, but when circumstances place them in a compromising situation, the town forces a more permanent partnership—marriage. If they can let down their guards with each other they might find that love is the greatest catch of all.

Winners will be announced on Saturday, 07/30/11.

Thursday, July 28, 2011

This week Barbour Publishing announced the company had decided to discontinue their Heartsong Presents Romance line. Editor Becky Germany broke the news to authors who are currently writing for the line or who have written for it in the past.

In her email she said:
In October 1992 a wonderful thing was born – Heartsong Presents Inspirational Book Club. I joined the team the very next year and have seen numerous outstanding authors hone their writing skills and build their readership through this series.

Now, with nearly 1000 books in print and within a changing publishing climate, Heartsong Presents is no longer reaching the readers like it once did so well. Committed book club members are harder to find and more expensive to keep. So Barbour Publishing has decided to close the club at the end of 2011.

And with those words came the realization that the line which launched many of the best-selling authors in today’s Christian fiction market is about to pass into history. Heartsong’s dedicated readers who love a sweet romance with a happy ending will now have to look elsewhere for the stories that have touched their hearts for years.

Along with the announcement that the line was closing came the additional news that Heartsong editor JoAnne Simmons who has been with Barbour for six years will be leaving the company. This news made me especially sad because I had the privilege of working with JoAnne as she guided me through three historical romances and a three-in-one in the Brides Series for the line. However, I know the Lord has great things in store for her.

The good news is that there will still be many opportunities at Barbour for writers of Christian fiction. Becky ended her announcement by saying:

The good news is that fiction remains a strong focus at Barbour Publishing including these lines:
Trade fiction (lots of romance)
Romancing America – romance story collections from both Heartsong Presents and newly written novellas
Bride and Wedding titles set in small American towns
Love Endures – Grace Livingston Hill classics

In 2012, I’ll be ready to look at new proposals, and I will consider Heartsong Presents authors even if you aren’t currently with an agent.

With the renewed emphasis on e-books, I suspect this news from Barbour may only be the beginning of more changes from other publishers to come. The world of publishing is in an upheaval right now, and authors are going to have to adjust to all the changes in the wind if we are to survive.

How do you feel about the demise of Heartsong? Leave a comment and let us know.



Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Born in Oklahoma City, Lacy Williams grew up near Calumet, Oklahoma, but her family moved to Edmond when she was twelve. Homeschooled K-12 grades, Lacy graduated cum laude from the University of Central Oklahoma in 2006. After working in the banking and public accounting fields, Lacy elected to stay home with her daughter. She and her husband are expecting baby #2—a boy—in September.

Lacy’s journey to publication started in high school, when she successfully completed a course on “Writing for Children and Teens” through the Institute of Children’s Literature. After a hiatus from writing during her college years, in 2006 Lacy began seriously pursuing publication and joined the American Christian Fiction Writers, a national organization. Through ACFW, Lacy met local writers, entered writing contests, joined critique groups, and attended writing conferences. In 2009, her novel won the Genesis award and was requested by the editor that eventually bought it. Now, Lacy is President of her local writers’ group and gives back by judging writing contests and mentoring other writers. Lacy also teaches writing courses part-time at Francis Tuttle.

Lacy loves to hear from readers. She posts short stories and giveaways at her website www.lacywilliams.net and can be found on social media at www.facebook.com/lacywilliamsbooks and www.twitter.com/lacy_williams.



Lacy is giving away a copy of her book, Marrying Miss Marshal. Be sure to stop by The Borrowed Book on Friday for your chance to win!

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Monday, July 25, 2011

Since childhood I've been a big fan of Charlie Brown, Snoopy, and all their friends. For those other die-hard fans out there, perhaps you recall the movie, It's The Easter Beagle, Charlie Brown. When the group heads to the mall around Easter time, they discover that the countdown to Christmas has already begun, and huge sales are advertised everywhere (complete with Christmas decorations). Do you remember what Lucy notes upon seeing such a sight?

"I told you - it's the gift-getting season!"

Now, what does all this talk of Easter (or Christmas, for that matter) have to do with this July 25th post? Well, this week we're celebrating "Christmas in July" on my personal blog, Seasons of Humility. (Forgive me for constantly talking about my own blog, but I find that when I need an idea for a post, I can just stick with similar themes between blogs...)

And to go with Christmas in July, I thought I'd let you know about some gift-getting opportunities! ;)

Free e-Book

OK, let's start with a freebie for everyone! As most of you are probably aware, Amazon.com offers some great, limited-time free Kindle e-books. Here's one such offer:

Just click on the image above to "purchase" your free e-copy of MaryLu's fabulous book, Surrender the Heart. But remember - this offer only lasts through July 31st!

Survey with Giveaways

Here's where my personal blog comes back in. Today I've posted a survey on Seasons of Humility. If you fill out the survey (which mostly pertains to my regular readers, but you're welcome to become a new reader if you're not one already!) and if you have a U.S. mailing address, you can sign up for a chance to win 5 Conversations You Must Have With Your Son or Surrender the Dawn (yes - that would be the third book in her latest series; the first book is the freebie mentioned above). Click on the image below to visit my blog:


An Alaskan Adventure!

This next giveaway is hosted by Bonnie Leon, author of the "Alaskan Skies" series. You can have a chance to win an "Alaskan Adventure in a Box," which includes a DVD, book, mugs, collectables, and some treats! Just click on the image below to learn how to enter. (You have until August 8th to enter.)


More Christmas in July

Waterbrook Multnomah is also celebrating Christmas in July with a fun and easy-to-enter giveaway! All you have to do is "TEXT 'Christmas In July' to 57682." The website says that winners will be notified by text message on August 1st, so I'm guessing this giveaway is still open until then. (Forgive me if I'm mistaken!) Just to be on the safe side, I'd enter soon! Click on the image below to learn more about the giveaway (including which Christmas books you can win):


Gift Giving

What's better than a "gift-getting" season? Well, I'd venture to say that would be a "gift-giving" season! May all this talk of Christmas in the summer season remind us to give to others all year long - and not just material gifts, but more importantly love, encouragement, comfort, a good example, and friendship.

I hope you all have fun entering the various contests (etc.), and feel free to let us know of any giveaways you might be hosting this week! And let's remember to let this be a season of gift giving, as well!

(Note: Charlie Brown movie image from IMDb.com.)

Saturday, July 23, 2011

It's always so much fun to give away great books!! Congratulations to this week's lucky winners:

Lydia (pumpkinbabyjane/at/gmail/dot/com) - Wolfsbane by Ronie Kendig

twiga92 - May on the Way: How I became a K9 Spy by KC Frantzen

Winners of this week’s books, please use the button in the upper right side of this page to email me with your mailing address so I can forward your information to the authors. Then, sit back and wait for your books to arrive.

Thank you all so much for stopping by The Borrowed Book and thank you, Ronie Kendig and KC Frantzen for your generosity in providing books!

Friday, July 22, 2011

Entering our weekly drawing is easy:

1. Leave a comment on Fridays or...

2. Sign up to follow The Borrowed Book. Followers will automatically be entered for a chance to win that week's drawing!

This week, The Borrowed Book is giving away:


Wolfsbane by Ronie Kendig ~ Embark upon a danger-laden mission within the pages of Ronie Kendig’s riveting Wolfsbane. Demolitions expert Danielle Roark thought escaping from a brutal Venezuelan general was a challenge. Now she’s charged with espionage and returned to the jungle where a new nightmare begins. Will Dani survive or become just another political pawn destined to be lost forever? Former Green Beret Canyon Metcalfe is disgusted with the suits on Capitol Hill. Still wrestling with the memories of a mission gone bad, he and Nightshade launch a mission to find Dani. Can Canyon rescue Dani, armed with nothing but raw courage?

May on the Way: How I became a K9 Spy by KC Frantzen ~ Readers of all ages will enjoy this engaging tale of hope even in the midst of difficulties. Join May as she tackles adventure head-on!








Winners will be announced on Saturday, 07/23/11.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Last week in Atlanta at ICRS, a news conference hosted by American Christian Fiction Writers and CBA, ACFW proudly announced the finalists in the Carol Awards. The Carol Awards, formerly Book of the Year, honor the highest achievement for published authors of Christian fiction. 
The Borrowed Book is proud to announce that two of its contributors, S. Dionne Moore and Sandra Robbins, have been named as finalists. Moore's Promise of Tomorrow and Robbins's The Columns of Cottonwood were two of three finalists in the Short Historical category. With over 300 entries in this year's contest, making the finalists list is a noteworthy accomplishment. 
Here's a blurb about both books:
Promise of Tomorrow
  Alaina Morrison loves Jack Kelly. So why won’t he realize that all she wants is to get married and begin their new life together? She doesn’t need a large home or new clothes or other things. She only needs him to actually spend time with her and to show how much he loves her.
As dangerous floodwaters threaten their home of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, will Alaina and Jack allow God to bridge their growing differences with His unifying love?

 The Columns of Cottonwood

       She grew up there; she lived through the war there; she lost her parents there. Even in its burned-out condition, it’s still home to Savannah Carmichael. But now it belongs to a stranger—a foreigner!—who paid the back taxes on it and bought it right out from under her.
         Dante Rinaldi never expected that the culmination of his dream—to own some of Alabama’s rich farmland—would mean the destruction of someone else’s. He hasn’t done anything illegal; in fact, he’s worked hard for the privilege of land ownership. So why does Savannah’s plight affect him on such a deep level?Both believe in the sovereignty of God, but how can this situation be orchestrated by Him? Can they find a solution. . .a compromise to benefit both?

From airport newstands to Newsweek, Christian fiction continues to grow in popularity, resonating with readers looking for both faith and fiction. The Borrowed Book is honored to have two contributors who are Carol Award finalists this year. The 2011 Carol Award winners in each category will be announced at ACFW's Awards Gala on Saturday, September 24, 2011, at the annual conference in St. Louis, Missouri.


Wednesday, July 20, 2011


Ronie Kendig grew up an Army brat and married a veteran. Together, she and her husband have four children, a Golden Retriever, and a Maltese Menace. She has a BS in Psychology, speaks to various groups, volunteers with the American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), and mentors new writers. Rapid-Fire Fiction, her brand, is exemplified through her novels Dead Reckoning, a spy thriller, and the military thriller series, The Discarded Heroes, which includes Nightshade (Retailer’s Choice Award Finalist), Digitalis, Wolfsbane, and Firethorn (January 2012). Ronie can be found at http://www.roniekendig.com/ or http://www.discardedheroes.com/

Did you see yourself becoming a writer as a child? If not, what did you dream of being?

No, for me my dreams were to be a secretary, a teacher, and a mom. I’m happy to say I’ve accomplished all of this, so being an author on top is the whipped cream of life.

How long did you write before you sold your first book?

I’d been writing all through high school and after I first married, but I didn’t really “get serious” about writing until 2000, when my husband encouraged me to write for publication. I have my first rejection letter dated November 2002. Dead Reckoning, my debut novel, sold in 2008.

Many of the people who follow our blog are aspiring writers themselves. Can you share your favorite writing tip with them?

Remember Who is in control. It’s so easy in this industry to become blinded by our desire to succeed, to get that first book published, then we want to win awards and sell the next book. It’s a never-ending cycle that really pulls at you as a writer. The only constant and unflappable source is God. Rest in Him. Do your best in honing your craft and telling your story, then yield the rest to Him.

Now for the readers…many times, it’s easy for them to connect with the characters in a book, but not so much the authors themselves. Share something about your day-to-day life that might help a reader to feel as though they know you a little better.

I am a homeschooling mom of four children, so my days are pretty much spent with them. We homeschool in the morning the and sometimes past lunch time. I have friends who don’t have children at home and they take nights off to talk and watch TV. Unfortunately, I can’t do that because my evenings are when I write.

Now that you are published, do you still experience rejections? If so, how are these rejections different or similar to the ones you received before becoming published?

Oh goodness yes. Rejections are part and parcel of the writer’s life. There’s not getting around it or away from it.

Tell us a little about your latest release:

Wolfsbane is a story that I actually wrote about six or seven years ago called, Signal of Hope. It’s been totally re-crafted and re-drafted though to fit within the context of the Nightshade team, but the main principles (Dani & Canyon) are still the same.

Here is the official blurb for this book:

A female demolitions who unwittingly holds a lethal secret. . .

A former Green Beret grappling with terrifying memories of a mission gone bad. . .

And the jungle that threatens to swallow them whole.

In Venezuela, Danielle Roark and her Army Corps of Engineers team is captured. After six months of captivity, Dani escapes, only to end up charged with espionage and forced to return to the jungle to prove that a nuclear facility exists. On the mission, she is abandoned by God and country. Will she live long enough to make those responsible pay? Haunted by memories of a mission gone bad, former Green Beret Canyon Metcalfe wrestles with his developing feelings for the feisty senator’s daughter. Setting aside his misgivings, he and Nightshade take the mission to help Dani unravel her lethal secrets. Separated from the team leaves Dani and Canyon vulnerable—and captured. After he is rescued, Canyon discovers Dani has been left behind. Livid, he sacrifices everything—including his role with Nightshade—to find Dani. Can Dani and Canyon fight the nightmare armed with only forgiveness and raw courage? Or will they lose their lives, minds, and each other?

If you could only share one line from Wolfsbane, which one would you choose and why?

This line: “If you only know one thing, know this—whatever happens down there, I’m not coming back without you.”

The reason I chose that line is it embodies not only Canyon “Midas” Metcalfe, the main character, but also foreshadows what’s going to happen in the story.

Writers often put things in their books that are very personal—like a funny story that happened to them, a spiritual truth they learned through difficulty, or even just a character trait that is uniquely theirs. Is there something in Wolfsbane that only people close to you know is about you or someone you know?

Ya know, I haven’t really thought about this much. I’m definitely not like Dani because she’s much more a tough chick than I am, and I’m not like Canyon (um, hello? If you need help figuring that one out…). I haven’t been addicted to painkillers either, but I have had family drama that resulted in certain family members not speaking.

Readers often talk a lot about the hero and heroine of a story, but today I’d like to know something about your villain. Does he or she have a redeeming quality? Why or why not?

In my series, I rarely have true, personified villain. My heroes are usually battling time against some catastrophic event. In Wolfsbane, there is a villain named General Bruzon. Probably his only quality that stands out, but I wouldn’t necessarily call redeeming, is that he is passionate about his country, Venezuela.

What kind of research did you have to do for this book? Can you share some articles or website links you found particularly helpful?

Since this is book 3 in the Discarded Heroes series, a good portion of research has been ongoing and plentiful. Probably the best resource for all things military are the actually .mil sites. There are endless books on Special Forces and Special Operations, so pointing to just one wouldn’t work. For Wolfsbane, I had to do some research on addictions to painkillers and I mostly used the Mayo Clinic’s website, which proved very helpful and informative.

Tell us what new projects you’re working on.

I’ve just finished a contemporary novella for a collection that will release next April from Barbour Books, and now I’m heading into my military war dog series, which I’m so very excited about! The first book, Trinity, will release August 2012 and features a Belgian Malinois and her handler, Heath Daniels.

The most common thing I hear when people learned I’ve published a book is, “I’ve always wanted to do that.” Faced with this statement, what advice would you give to someone just starting out in this business?

My agent once told me the only writers who fail are the ones who quit. With that in mind, remember that writing is not as easy as it looks and that sometimes, the road is long, hard, and lonely. But if you believe you’re supposed to write, then do it with all your heart, and “never give up, never surrender.”

What is the one question you were afraid I would ask…and how would you answer?

Which character is my favorite? I don’t have a favorite because they’re ALL favorites! :-D


Ronie is giving away a copy of her book, Wolfsbane. Be sure to stop by The Borrowed Book on Friday for your chance to win!

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Monday, July 18, 2011

May the K9 Spy is the star of a new book series by author KC Frantzen! Here's a little more about KC and May:

"KC Frantzen learned to speak critter at a young age, which helped her tell May's story. The family lives in the Tennessee hills - two humans, two horses, and several rescued dogs, including May."

Amber: Thank you so much for joining us today, KC! To start, could you share with us a little about the star of your book, May, and what readers might be surprised to learn about her?

KC: Amber, thank you for asking us.

Sure. Our May is something else. We rescued her, in about the same way as the book. Many of the adventures are true, with some literary license tossed in just for fun. Up to the reader to tell which is what, BOL FTITK. (That's Barking Out Loud, for those in the know.)

When meeting May in person, most people are shocked to learn she is 11 yrs old. She is still so playful, she acts like a puppy. It's pawmazing. We stopped by our local library last Friday in preparation for our summer reading program presentation and PAWograph session this week and she was an instant hit. She takes it upon herself to make sure no one is left out and EVERYONE has the opportunity to play.

She never met a stranger and not assume you will love her, which still amazes us considering her start in life. Plus, most smaller dogs are careful around kids but not our May. She adores kids of all ages. I admire her and it seemed that God gave me this story and wouldn't let me alone until I told it.

Amber: May sounds like quite the special dog!

What sort of audience do you think would most enjoy
May on the Way: How I Become a K9 Spy, and what do you hope readers will gain from May’s story?

KC: We say animal lovers 8 and up. It's in 13 point font so it's large enough for younger and older readers, like*ahem* myself. The story seems to appeal to a variety of ages. One reader who is 6 and home-schooled totally got into the story and flopped on her belly, just like May does in one scene. That makes an author's heart do a happy flutter, let me tell you!

We've heard from some teens who enjoyed it, on up to people in my age group (50's – can it be?!) and even into 70's and 80's. I'm not sure what to make of this yet but it's been fun so far to hear the responses. In fact, one of May's Facebook fans (a lovely Border Collie named Zoey) sent an original paw-painting for May's birthday. It's just too much fun.

Some have related to the animals in the story, their methods of communication and seem to have developed or enhanced their empathy for them. Others have talked about the overall theme of hope and how things can look bleak but turn out alright. Several have mentioned the Biblical principles I tried to infuse in a palatable way. (I'm a Christian and write from that worldview, but it is not a "Christian" book.)

Amber: That's great! It's neat when a book can appeal to all age groups.

These next two questions are for May: You must be one adventurous pup! Can you give us a glimpse into the life of a K9 spy?

May: Hi Miss Amber. /waving paw/ Hello readers! I'm wiggling my entire self!!! So happy to meet you.

Would you like to play toss and fetch? Hide and go seek? Yes?! I have a variety of toys nearby, what's your pleasure? Lobbie (the lobster) is my FAVORITE!

I can give you just a little, because most of it is secret. Perhaps when I retire, whenever that might be… I could tell you more. But I can say it is an honor to serve our country, as I defend freedom and the American way. I wondered what I, just a small dog could do, but the Creator loves to give us the desires of our hearts doesn't He? My pesty qualities (as my grouchy big sister April says) have served me well.

Amber: It's a pleasure to meet you, May! Your sacrificial and loving heart is a great example to dogs and humans alike. =)

So, would you say you’re a type of detective? If so, do you have any advice for us humans about discovering doggie clues and solving the mysteries of doggie behaviors?


May: Well, I guess you could, but I'm really in the K9 Service. Our job is to track anarchists who seek to do us harm and stop them by whatever means necessary. Uhmmm. That's all I can really tell you about it. But thank you for asking. (Piffle. I may have said too much already.)

There's no mystery on our behavior, really. My advice is to pay attention, we communicate all the time! And… unless we've been trained otherwise, we inherently are loyal to humans and kind. Of course, some of us K9s are evil, just like you humans. But that doesn't happen very often, at least in my experience, though I'm still new.

Would you readers like a sneak peek? This is about ½ way through my story. I'm out in the woods (when I shouldn't be) and…

MMMM, I smell rainwater. I’m parched. The bird stationed on the hollow log turns to watch me as I approach. “Pardon. I don’t want to frighten you, but I’m thirsty.”

Odd. It’s sure clumsy.

It tilts its wings and hovers before plunking down on the shed. “Thanks for sharing.”

I plunge my tongue into the cool water. Lap, lap, lap, lap. It has a pleasant algae whang, so different from
city water in a grimy bowl. There’s another taste though, not damp wood… more like…

Is this log made of concrete? Need to check this out. Sniff, sniff, snuffle.


As I trot to the side nearest the shed, the bird makes an awkward landing on my back. “Hi again. Want to help? Hey! Stop buzzing me. We can play later.”


It makes another pass by and slams into my ear. “Stop it! What’s wrong with you?” Sniff, sniff. “You don’t smell alive.”


We square off. As it veers nearby, I duck and take a swat at it. “I’m sorry, but don’t play so rough.” But it doesn’t quit. After several passes, I make contact. Definitely not a bird. And I think I broke it!


The contraption nosedives into the side of the shed – CLUNK. It makes a whirring motor-type sound but can’t seem to take off. As I advance, it starts smoking, then lies silent.


Is it a security guard, like April? For what? Better check out this shed.


Amber: Well, that should intrigue readers, for sure! Thanks, May!

Back to KC: Will we be reading more stories about May the K9 Spy in the future?

KC: Book 2 is in the works now! You can read an excerpt at the end of May on the Way. In fact, would you like a quick story about that?

The idea for the book sprang from a comment by Sandra Byrd, one of my mentors in the Christian Writers Guild. After writing the same scene from three different viewpoints, Sandra said how much she liked the character. It never made it into the first book, so that's how I knew we'd have a series! May is such a strong character, perhaps we will have many adventures. That's up to her readers!

Amber: Very cool! Thank you again for sharing more about May and her adventures with us today!

Readers, you can learn more about KC and May, as well as purchase a copy of their book, at their super cool website!

And you can also learn more about the book by visiting my personal blog, Seasons of Humility, today as we begin "Mystery Week!"

Also, be sure to stop by the BB on Friday for a chance to win a copy of May on the Way: How I Become a K9 Spy!

(Note: All photos and artwork (c) 2011 KC Frantzen.)

Saturday, July 16, 2011

It's always so much fun to give away great books!! Congratulations to this week's lucky winners:

Linda Maendel - The Promise of an Angel by Ruth Reid

Carla Gade - Love Letters in the Sand by Diann Hunt

Winners of this week's books, please use the button in the upper right side of this page to email me with your mailing address so I can forward your information to the authors. Then, sit back and wait for your book to arrive.

Thank you all so much for stopping by The Borrowed Book and thank you, Ruth Reid and Diann Hunt, for your generosity in providing books!

Friday, July 15, 2011

Entering our weekly drawing is easy:

1. Leave a comment on Fridays or...

2. Sign up to follow The Borrowed Book. Followers will automatically be entered for a chance to win that week's drawing!

This week, The Borrowed Book is giving away:



The Promise of an Angel by Ruth Reid ~ Interrupting the ordered routine of the Mecosta County Amish settlement, an angelic visitor awakens Judith to a new faith.

All Judith Fischer ever wanted is to marry within her community and raise a family. She longs for the day when her parents will allow Levi Plank to officially court her.

But on the day Judith suspects Levi will ask her parent's permission, her younger brother Samuel has an accident under her charge. Rushing to Samuel's aid, Judith spies a strange man helping him; a man she later believes was an angel.

When she shares her conviction with her family and close friends, she is shocked to find that no one believes her, including Levi. In the days following the accident, the angel visits Judith with information that may guide her down the path of faith, should she choose to follow.

As her community slowly distances themselves, only one person is willing to stand up for her―the bishop's son, Andrew Lapp. But can he convince the settlement to listen to her? With a show of faith that flies in the face of her conservative upbringing, can Judith hold strong to the promise that there are even greater things in store for those who believe in God's miracles?


Love Letters in the Sand by Diann Hunt ~ The tide of World War II washed away her happily-ever-after dreams and left heartbreak in its wake, but Eva Hilton dares to consider another chance at love.

However, the jilted teacher’s past catches up with her when battle-scarred Paul Sommerfeld re-enters her life in 1957. Together they attempt to navigate the shifting sands of their relationship as painful truths come to light. Will Eva ultimately discover that, though the tide washed away their once-upon-a-time love letters in the sand, she and Paul have a love that will be forever written upon their
hearts?

Winners will be announced on Saturday, 07/16/11.

Thursday, July 14, 2011

I’m happy to have my friend Christa Allan as a guest today at The Borrowed Book. Christa describes herself as a true Southern woman who knows that any cook worth her gumbo always starts with a roux and who never wears white after Labor Day. Christa is a writer of not your usual Christian Fiction. She weaves stories of unscripted grace and redemption with threads of hope, humor, and heart. Christa is the mother of five adult children, a grandmother of three, and a teacher of high school English. She and her husband Ken live in Abita Springs, Louisiana, where they and their three cats enjoy their time playing golf, dreaming about retirement and dodging hurricanes.
Welcome, Christa. Let me start by asking a question I’m curious about. When did you first know that you wanted to be a writer?

 I started writing in high school when I realized that I couldn’t sing [at least not anything anyone would want to listen to], I couldn’t dance, I couldn’t draw or paint anything beyond stick figures, and as for sports…well, let’s just say I was the kid everyone wanted on the other team.  Many years later and married, I wrote for a newspaper when I had two children and two on the way, then—when four of my five children were out of the house, I decided to start writing a novel.  Actually, I started because my precious husband had more faith in me than I had in myself. He guilted me into getting started by buying me a laptop!   


After you began writing, how long did it take to make that first sale?

After three years of writing Walking on Broken Glass, I signed with an agent. About four months after that, my agent started shopping the novel. I was sure that at least one publisher out of that long list she’d sent it to would leap at the opportunity.

Not so much. One month later, she called to tell me that the editors thought the novel was “too issue-driven.”  She said she’d continue to look for a home for it, but I may want to start considering some ideas for another book.

I spent my summer working on proposals for my editor appointments at the next ACFW Conference. A few months before the conference, my agent met Barbara Scott, the then-fiction editor of Abingdon Press, a Methodist publishing house launching fiction for the first time. She pitched my novel, and Barbara asked to see it. A few weeks later, Barbara said she was interested. My agent called at 11:43 am on October 30, 2008 to tell me Abingdon bought my novel.

I roomed with you at the ACFW conference when you first pitched Walking on Broken Glass. I knew it would sell. Now you have a second book. What is its title?

The Edge of Grace

I’ve read The Edge of Grace, and it’s a wonderful book. Give us a blurb about it.

An early morning call shatters Caryn Becker's world. Her brother David announces that he is gay, and Caryn completely rejects the one person who stood beside her during her husband's illness and death. Unable to cope with David's news, Caryn disappears into her own turbulent life as a single mom and new business owner.


What inspirational message do you want readers to take away after reading The Edge of Grace?

So many people look so bright-faced happy and pretty on the outside that we’re duped into believing they lead charmed lives.  Like those families in the picture frames sold in stores (who ARE those people, by the way?!). But turn those pictures over, and what’s there…nothing.   That’s not the life God planned for us. He wants our lives to be framed by His love. We’re called to compassion. We’re called to love.

Which character in the book is your favorite? Why?

My favorite character in this book was Max. He’s charming, compassionate and confident. And he’s a man of faith.

Where one has lived often affects the settings a writer uses in his/her stories. Have you found this to be true in your writing?

Absolutely. You can’t grow up as one of the GRITS (girls raised in the South; wish I’d thought of that acronym first; I’d be a zillionaire) and not have it permeate every aspect of your life…like the humidity here. There’s so much history in New Orleans, you can almost feel it when you walk through the Vieux Carre, the Marigny. the Garden District. We celebrate life. Sometimes a wee bit overboard, but we find strength in our traditions, our families and our faith.

Having been friends with you for a long time, I know you are a busy lady. How do you juggle all your responsibilities and still find time to write wonderful novels?

You’re so kind!

Of the over twenty years I’ve spent teaching high school, I’d only call myself a writer for the past six or so. I suppose if I didn’t feel compelled to “reinvent the wheel every year,” I might have more emotional energy to devote to writing during the school year.  I’m constantly searching for more effective ways to engage my students, and it’s time intensive, especially when I’m already drowning in a sea of papers. Adding writing to that is like, in the words of my grandmother, “trying to squeeze California into Rhode Island.”

 I know many writers advocate daily or weekly word or page goals. At this point in my life, I haven’t found that works for me. I don’t have the emotional capacity to handle it all during a school week.  So, I focus on taking advantage of my summers, holidays, and weekends for writing.  And, like that seesaw, sometimes, I’m down when I should be up. But I know that I can push myself where I need to be.

Sometimes our families require more of our attention, so we yank ourselves out of the orbit of work or school or whatever, to devote time to them. Other days, it might be work. I remind myself that asking God for direction here should come first.

I also know you to be a fun-loving individual who likes to laugh and live life to the fullest. What would you say is the quirkiest thing you have ever done?

That I can’t think of something quirky makes me a bit uneasy. Either I don’t have quirks  (unlikely) or my quirks are so ingrained, I don’t know they’re quirks.

What are you working on now? Can we expect other books to release soon?

My next novel should be out in January or February of 2012, and it’s Love Finds You in New Orleans from Summerside Press.  I’m so excited that Summerside has made it possible for New Orleans to now be included in this impressive series. Plus, writing an 1840s historical has made for fascinating research. In fact, I sometimes forget that I’m supposed to be writing a novel, and get transported back into time myself!  It’s also been a new experience for my family because now I start most conversations with, “Did you know that in the early 19th century….?”
Following that, I have a three-book contract with Abingdon for novels in 2012 and 2013. Titles yet to be determined.
For the aspiring writers who may be reading this, what advice would you give them?
Write what you’re passionate about. If you were told you could only write one book in your life, what book would it be? Write that one.

Trust the story. A good story trumps. That’s not to say you can submit an unformatted, sloppy, error-ridden manuscript.

You’ll be told agents/editors don’t like prologues. My first book had a prologue. Or that they don’t like first person point-of-view. My first book was written in first person with third person journal entries. Or that you can’t write about subjects that rock the Christian boat. The protagonist of my first novel is an alcoholic.

Or, you’ll be told the opposite of all of these. And while other writers’ opinions are valuable, don’t edit the life of your manuscript based on what you think might appeal to agents/editors. What appeals to them is a manuscript they can’t put down.

Is there anything else you’d like to tell us that I haven’t asked?

That I so appreciate readers and bloggers who invite me to share my story! Thanks to all of you for my being here.

Here’s some contact info: Website: www.christaallan.com, Twitter: ChristaAllan Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChristaAllan.Author 

Thank you, Christa for stopping by today. Christa would like to give away a copy of her book this week. Leave a comment, and you'll be entered for the drawing.     

Wednesday, July 13, 2011


Best-selling author Diann Hunt writes romantic comedy and heartwarming women’s fiction. Since 2001, she has published three novellas, eighteen novels, and co-authored a devotional for the CBA market.

Diann lives in Indiana with her real-life hero-husband of 36 years who continually lavishes her with chocolate—well, she can imagine it, can’t she? She’s a fiction writer, after all.

Welcome, Diann! Easy question do start...did you see yourself becoming a writer as a child? If not, what did you dream of being?

I never thought of becoming a writer, but I always loved to tell stories. I made them up all the time for the neighborhood kids. I made one up for my dad once. I loved watching his eyes grow wider as I told the story (making it up as I went along). Finally, when I said I was just kidding, he wasn’t amused and let me know it. We had a good laugh over it when I became a writer.

How long did you write before you sold your first book?

I wrote a couple of articles in 1998 and ’99. I tried my hand at a novella in 2000 and it was published in 2001. It doesn’t always happen that quickly, but I got into the business when fiction was really taking off.

Many of the people who follow our blog are aspiring writers themselves. Can you share your favorite writing tip with them?

My favorite writing tip? I find that reading current books on writing keeps me creatively energized. I’ve also learned to work hard but make room for play and rest, too.

Now for the readers…many times, it’s easy for them to connect with the characters in a book, but not so much the authors themselves. Share something about your day-to-day life that might help a reader to feel as though they know you a little better.

I wake up with bed head hair. Coffee snobs will hate me for this, but I drink Folgers instant coffee. It’s true. Not a smidge of fiction in that statement. I do add mocha creamer and whipped cream, though (every cup is a party). Then I spend time with my Lord before starting my day.

Another little known fact: I hate to clean toilets.

LOL! I hate cleaning toilets, too. I figured once I sold a book, I'd never have to do that again. Imagine my disappointment! On top of that, I still experience rejections. Now that you are published, do you? If so, how are these rejections different or similar to the ones you received before becoming published?

Yes. Rejections are a part of the business. The rejections now are more in relation to the publisher’s needs.

Tell us a little about your latest release.

Love Letters in the Sand is the tender love story of a young couple whose lives were separated by war, secrets and betrayal. A story of forgiveness and healing.

If you could only share one line from Love Letters in the Sand, which one would you choose and why?

“She would wait. No matter how long it took, Julia would wait for Stefan.”

That has significance to me for so many reasons. When we vow our love to another, we never know where that may take us. Life can be wonderful, life can be difficult, or a smeary mix of the two. But Julia would wait. No matter how long it took.

As I battle ovarian cancer, the love my husband has shown me makes me think of Julia. When we dated, we lived in different cities, so when we vowed our love to one another through love letters of our own, neither of us knew the depths of what that might entail. But our love has held strong through the rough waters. It was worth waiting for.

Writers often put things in their books that are very personal—like a funny story that happened to them, a spiritual truth they learned through difficulty, or even just a character trait that is uniquely theirs. Is there something in Love Letters in the Sand that only people close to you know is about you or someone you know?

I didn’t purposely plan anything for this book, though I’m usually learning spiritual lessons along with my characters. However, Julia’s dad in the story got a motorcycle, and my husband got a motor, ah-hem, scooter only a few years ago. That’s been a bit of a ride (pardon the pun). :-)

Readers often talk a lot about the hero and heroine of a story, but today I’d like to know something about your villain. Does he or she have a redeeming quality? Why or why not?

In Love Letters, I see the mother somewhat as a villain in the story. She has built walls around her emotional self, but as the story unfolds, we find the reasons for her rough exterior.

What kind of research did you have to do for this book? Can you share some articles or website links you found particularly helpful?

I bought a couple of books on the lives of people, soldiers and civilians, during World War II, to give me a flavor for life at that time.

Tell us what new projects you’re working on.

Recently finished the edits for my novella contribution to the book, Smitten, which I am co-writing with Kristin Billerbeck, Colleen Coble, and Denise Hunter. It’s a story of four heroines trying to turn their dying lumber town into a romance capital and the love they find along the way. We have just received a contract for two more books in the series.

The most common thing I hear when people learned I’ve published a book is, “I’ve always wanted to do that.” Faced with this statement, what advice would you give to someone just starting out in this business?

I always encourage them to join ACFW so they can participate in the courses, get to know other writers, find mentors, etcetera. I also advise them of the value of conferences for networking and learning more about the business.

What is the one question you were afraid I would ask…and how would you answer?

I was afraid you would ask if I’d read all of the classics. My answer would be I’m waiting for the movies to come out.

:-)


Diann is giving away a copy of her book, Love Letters in the Sand. Be sure to stop by The Borrowed Book on Friday for your chance to win!

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

I read an interesting article last week. It was all about contest entries and how to pimp them in order to win. You see, there’s a whole lot of people who have analyzed writing contests and their entries to discern what makes an entry a "winner." The author of the article I read was a case in point. Once she pinpointed the elements judges most wanted to see, she pimped her entries to meet the researched “must-have” elements, and entered them. Guess what? Four out of five of her entries finaled.

I’d love to hear opinions on this. Do you think it’s true that you must slant your chapters to match what judges want most (and that’s *after* you’ve already analyzed the information to figure out exactly what they want)? Is this unfair? Why? What solution do you propose?

Monday, July 11, 2011


Ruth Reid is a full-time pharmacist who lives in Dade City, Florida with her husband and three children. Her fascination for the Amish began twenty-years ago when she skipped college classes to watch a barn-raising. Today, she’s still captivated by the simple ways of the Amish lifestyle, and in her debut novel, The Promise of an Angel, she writes about what started her curiosity with the Amish—a barn raising. When Ruth is not working, she loves photography.

Did you see yourself becoming a writer as a child? If not, what did you dream of being?

After entering a young author’s contest in grade school, I was hooked on storytelling. Looking back, I’m sure my introverted personality and the fact I could entertain myself with observation, played a major role in developing the book characters.

How long did you write before you sold your first book?

It seems writing has been a part of everything I’ve done. Several years ago, I completed an instructor’s guide for teaching children to pray. When I offered it to be used in my church, I became the designated instructor. As far as novels, I didn’t pursue publication until after my second novel was completed.

Many of the people who follow our blog are aspiring writers themselves. Can you share your favorite writing tip with them?

Use your God given senses: sight, sound, taste, touch, and scent. You’ll find it enriches the story through your character’s point of view. I still struggle with sensory details. Something I’ve done after I’ve finished a scene is underline each time a sense was used with a different color highlighter. It helps to point out what areas are lacking. If you have a page with no color, the scene is usually flat.

Excellent advice! Now for the readers…many times, it’s easy for them to connect with the characters in a book, but not so much the authors themselves. Share something about your day-to-day life that might help a reader to feel as though they know you a little better.

My day-to-day life rotates in 7 day increments. I’m a pharmacist 7 nights and a writer 7 days (sometimes nights). Then it all repeats. In the meantime, I’m a wife and mother of three children 24/7. We have a Weimaraner named Zyvox and a Jack Russell named Lady Bird.

Now that you are published, do you still experience rejections? If so, how are these rejections different or similar to the ones you received before becoming published?

Since The Promise of an Angel is number one in the Heaven on Earth series, I haven’t had any time to think of other ideas to submit. There’s no doubt I’ll have future ideas rejected—that’s the book business.

Tell us a little about your latest release:

Interrupting the ordered routine of the Mecosta County Amish settlement, an angelic visitor awakens Judith to a new faith, but not without obstacles to overcome.

After a barn raising accident, Judith Fischer's convinced she's met an angel. However, her attempts to convince others end up frustrating her Old-Order Amish community. Only Andrew Lapp believes her, but the rest, including Levi Plank, the man's she's waited to marry, demand she forget the nonsense. Meanwhile, her younger sister, Martha, has taken a fancy to Levi. Martha sees her sister's controversy as a perfect distraction for turning Levi's head.

If you could only share one line from The Promise of an Angel, which one would you choose and why?

The line would have to be when the angel asks Judith, “Do you believe, Judith?”

In some ways it reminded me of when Jesus asked Peter what he believed. Who was Jesus to him? Peter’s answer cemented his decision to follow Christ—no matter the cost. In the book, Judith’s answer carries consequences in her Amish settlement.

Writers often put things in their books that are very personal—like a funny story that happened to them, a spiritual truth they learned through difficulty, or even just a character trait that is uniquely theirs. Is there something in The Promise of an Angel that only people close to you know is about you or someone you know?

Probably not so much in this book, but in Brush of Angels Wings, book 2 in the series, the heroine is a bad cook and unable to keep her stitches straight. I’m not a good cook. I cook on one temperature—high. I sew on one speed—fast. I eat a lot of burnt food and I spend way too much time tearing out stitches.

Readers often talk a lot about the hero and heroine of a story, but today I’d like to know something about your villain. Does he or she have a redeeming quality? Why or why not?

My heroine’s sister, Martha, is the villain in The Promise of an Angel. The beauty of writing an inspirational story is that God’s grace is not just for the main characters. His love and mercy extends to the villain as she struggles to recognize her own flaws. Most readers won’t think Martha deserves forgiveness, but that just shows the extent of God’s love.

What kind of research did you have to do for this book? Can you share some articles or website links you found particularly helpful?

Since there is such a vast difference in the individual Amish districts, the primary source I used to research for The Promise of an Angel was through individual interviews with my Amish friends from the Michigan settlement. They were very kind to open their house and explain many of the misconceptions between their district and the Lancaster Amish.

Tell us what new projects you’re working on.

Currently, I’m finishing up book two of my Heaven on Earth series titled: Brush of Angel’s Wings.

The most common thing I hear when people learned I’ve published a book is, “I’ve always wanted to do that.” Faced with this statement, what advice would you give to someone just starting out in this business?

Don’t wait until tomorrow to start. Ask others to read it and listen to what they like and dislike. Use their advice to improve. Most of all keep writing—even when you don’t know what to write—write.

What is the one question you were afraid I would ask…and how would you answer?

I’m not usually afraid of answering questions. Of course, I’m not on video feed so you don’t ever see my deer-in-the-headlights stare. I’ll be in trouble when video becomes the norm for interviews.

Links where I can be found:

http://ruthreid.com/
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Author-Ruth-Reid/183828688320022

Ruth is giving away a copy of her book, The Promise of an Angel. Be sure to stop by The Borrowed Book on Friday for your chance to win!

Saturday, July 9, 2011

It's always so much fun to give away great books!! Congratulations to this week's lucky winner:

Bonnie R. Paulson - The Daddy Surprise by Ginny Aiken

Bonnie, please use the button in the upper right side of this page to email me with your mailing address so I can forward your information to the author. Then, sit back and wait for your book to arrive.

Thank you all so much for stopping by The Borrowed Book and thank you, Ginny Aiken (via publicist) for your generosity in providing a book!

Friday, July 8, 2011

Entering our weekly drawing is easy:

1. Leave a comment on Fridays or...

2. Sign up to follow The Borrowed Book. Followers will automatically be entered for a chance to win that week's drawing!

This week, The Borrowed Book is giving away:


The Daddy Surprise by Ginny Aiken ~ Matthew "Ryder" Lyndon has just learned he's the father of a five-year-old girl. A girl who suddenly appears in his life with her mother, Lucie Adams—and Lucie is everything Ryder remembers. Beautiful, sun-washed, a free spirit who made him smile. But she'd trampled his heart with her sudden disappearance six years ago. Coming face-to-face with each other again, both Ryder and Lucie are reminded of what they once shared. Now God has given him an unexpected blessing in their daughter. After all this time, can Ryder find a place for them in his life?

Winners will be announced on Saturday, 07/09/11.

Thursday, July 7, 2011

Last week I posted about the release of my Love Inspired Suspense Dangerous Reunion. This week I want to let you know about a very different story of mine that has recently released from Barbour’s Heartsong Presents Romance line.
Blues Along the River is the third book in my Alabama Brides series. These books are set in the Black Belt of Alabama in the fictional town of Willow Bend in the years after the Civil War. The Columns of Cottonwood released last fall, and Dinner at the St. James released in January. Alabama Brides containing all three books will release in October.
Since my first published books were suspense, writing these historical romance stories has given me great pleasure. When I became an author, I intended to write historical romance but I got sidetracked. Now I’m thrilled that I’m getting to write the two genres I love the most.
Blues Along the River tells the story of Victoria Turner, a na├»ve young girl from Mobile, who arrives in Willow Bend, Alabama, sixteen years after the end of the Civil War. When she steps off the steamboat, the first person she meets is Marcus Raines, the handsome owner of Pembrook Plantation. Victoria who is unhappy over her move to the little river town sees in Marcus the chance to live a privileged life as the wife of a man she thinks will fulfill all her dreams. Unfortunately, she doesn’t look below the surface to see what hidden secrets may control her life in the plantation’s big house.
Here’s the back cover blurb from the book:
When Victoria Turner and Marcus Raines marry, they're both surprised to quickly discover they're not living happily ever after. Marcus continues to remember his late father's warnings about women betraying men, and he wonders if that is exactly what Victoria is doing when she refuses to abide by his wishes. Victoria is appalled that Marcus doesn't recognize how the South is changing after the war and that he can no longer treat his tenant farmers the way his father treated their slaves. Instead of being full of joy, their lives in their beautiful plantation home along the Alabama River reflect the blues sung by the workers.
Will Victoria and Marcus find answers they need by turning to the Author of their love? Or will the pain of their pasts and their unwillingness to forgive leave their hearts empty and their home filled with bitterness?
I posted two days this week on the Heartsong Connection Blog about Blues Along the River. To read those posts, click here.
I enjoyed researching this book and learning so much about the problems experienced in the South after the Civil War. The years following that great conflict were filled with uncertainty. It was a time when love of God, family, and the land were the only roads to a renewed future.
The Civil War, like so many others, took the lives of thousands who died to make sure all Americans have the freedom they deserve. This week as I celebrated the Fourth of July I thanked God to be living in a country where every member of society can experience the freedom afforded to us by those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.
 What about you? As an Amerian, what are you thankful for? 





Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Matthew "Ryder" Lyndon has just learned he's the father of a five-year-old girl. A girl who suddenly appears in his life with her mother, Lucie Adams—and Lucie is everything Ryder remembers. Beautiful, sun-washed, a free spirit who made him smile. But she'd trampled his heart with her sudden disappearance six years ago. Coming face-to-face with each other again, both Ryder and Lucie are reminded of what they once shared. Now God has given him an unexpected blessing in their daughter. After all this time, can Ryder find a place for them in his life? Click Here for an excerpt from The Daddy Surprise by Ginny Aiken.


Ginny Aiken, a former newspaper reporter, lives in
Pennsylvania with her husband and their three younger sons--the oldest is married, has flown the coop, and made her a doting grandmother. Born in Havana, Cuba, and raised in Valencia and Caracas Venezuela, Ginny discovered books at an early age. She wrote her first novel at age fifteen while she trained with the Ballets de Caracas, later to be known as the Venezuelan National Ballet. She burned that tome when she turned a "mature" sixteen. An ecletic list of jobs--including stints as reporter, paralegal, choreographer, language teacher, retail salesperson, wife, mother of four boys, and herder of their numerous and assorted friends, including twenty-some years of soccer teams, and the 135 members of first the Crossmen and then the Bluecoats Drum & Bugle Corps--brought her back to books in search of her sanity. She is now the author of twenty-nine published works, but she hasn't caught up with that elusive sanity yet.

The Borrowed Book is giving away a copy of The Daddy Surprise by Ginny Aiken. Be sure to stop by on Friday for your chance to win!

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Monday, July 4, 2011

Today is a day to commemorate the liberty of the United States of America--Independence Day! But for me, another special anniversary will occur in 11 days. It will be the first anniversary of the Chapel Service and Graveside Committal and Honors at Arlington National Cemetery for my great-uncle and his fellow crew-members: a group who made the greatest sacrifice for their country during WWII.

How I ended up in Washington D.C. July 15th, 2010 is a long and amazing story. If you're a long-time follower of my personal blog, Seasons of Humility, then you might already be familiar with it. If you're not familiar with the story and you 'd like to learn more, I highly recommend you read this article: Seven WWII Airmen Buried at Arlington National Cemetery. Suffice it to say, my great-uncle (Private Robert L. Crane) and the crew he served with crashed en route to Burma delivering supplies during WWII, and the remains of the crash weren't discovered until almost 60 years later. Last year the remains were given a proper burial, and these brave men were given the honor they so rightfully deserved.

Because my dad is one of great-uncle Robert's oldest surviving relatives, he had the opportunity to go to Washington D.C. to see the service, and I was able to go with him! This was one of the most moving experiences of my life, and so today as we celebrate Independence Day, I'd like to honor the memory of all those who gave their lives for freedom by sharing some of what I saw:

(The following quotes and videos are taken from a couple of the blog posts I wrote in July 2010.)

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

"After we returned from seeing [some] great sights, we rested (well, technically I worked on stuff for this blog!), ate a group dinner at the hotel, and then we met to go to Murphy Funeral Home for the Visitation Service.

And wow--talk about moving! Hearing about the lives of those seven men, including my great uncle, was both wonderful and deeply touching. My great uncle was only in his early twenties when he died, and seeing him and some of the other members of his squadron in pictures was hard. He was so young!

But I do know this: they died for a noble cause. We were privileged to hear from a couple of the men who were part of the group my great uncle was bringing supplies to when the plane crashed. It brought me to tears to hear them say that my great uncle was on his way to help preserve lives when his own was lost. These were real men, loved and missed by their families, and honored by the country they served. And being reminded of the stories of these men encouraged me even more to write, because if it's God's will I want to share stories that will be real . . . stories that God can use in a real way.

This following video shows pictures of memorials that honor these great men and so many others who gave their all for those of us who don't appreciate their efforts nearly as much as we ought. How can we ever show enough gratitude to those who paid the ultimate price? How can we ever show enough gratitude to their loved ones who let them go? And how can we ever even come close to showing enough gratitude to God--who sent His own Son to die for us, offering us a chance to go home and truly be free?"


video

Thursday, July 15, 2010

"I have no words to tell you what the service at Arlington National Cemetery was like. Even now as I write this, tears are coming to my eyes. I put together another video to try and capture some of the experience, which I hope will convey even just a little of the emotion of this morning. The love, the service, and the honor shown this day will never be forgotten."

video

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